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Answer: Is 'series' singular or plural

Today's question is about whether or not the word series is singular or plural. Because the English language can be a touch on the unexpected side, the answer to that is that it's both.
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ANSWER: Hear, hear or here, here?

This week we are going to focus on the proper use of hear, hear vs here, here. And we're going to have help from the Stargate SG-1 crew.

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It’s Monday again, dear Fandom Grammar readers!  Considering this particular day of the week means trading leisure for work (or schoolwork) for the next five days, it’s easy to feel gloomy on Mondays and gawk at the long wait until Friday.  But today we’re going to focus on the positive instead of the negative, like our two idioms of the day suggest: “The darkest hour is just before the dawn” and “every cloud has a silver lining.”  To better shine the light on these two Positive-Polly phrases, we’ll get some help from the characters of Silent Hill, who are experts at finding their way in the dark.

Click on this cut for illumination on these two idioms.Collapse )

ANSWER: "envy" versus "jealousy"

Happy Halloween, dear Fandom Grammar readers!  Since we find ourselves once again on that most famous Day of Ghouls and Fright, it is only fitting that we examine two very terrible, very different, but often mistaken words whose definitions are no less insidious for the error: envy and jealousy.  Such a daunting challenge requires the assistance of those who have experience investigating humankind’s inner malice.  So, aiding us in our investigation of these two “evils within” will be Detective Sebastian Castellanos and the other characters from The Evil Within.

This won’t hurt—too much. Let’s get started, shall we?Collapse )

Friday Funnies: Grammar Sheriff

Welcome to another installment of the Friday Funnies! Just on a Monday!

{Bonus points to anyone who gets that reference.}


Cyanide & Happiness (Explosm.net)


Even when I hear things like this being said in Westerns or by "hillbillies", it still makes my skin crawl. But I'd be a hypocrite if I said I've never used a double negative before. My prime transgression? "Ain't nobody got no time for that."

So what's your favorite double negative to say?
One of our readers asks, “How many exclamation marks are too many? What is the standard usage on number of exclamation marks in a sentence or on a page?”

This sounds like a question born in the era of OMG!!!!!1!!1eleventy!, but questions around overuse of exclamation marks—or exclamation points in American English—have been around for much longer. Here is some advice, old and new, with examples from Stargate SG-1.Collapse )
In today’s edition of Say What?, we’ll be taking a look at a couple of sayings that remind you that what you say, or maybe what you don’t say, can have great impact on what people think of you.  Let’s jump right into better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt and tell the truth and shame the devil, with some help from the characters in Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

Telling the truth doesn’t make you a fool, does it?Collapse )

Answer: What is the origin of "rigmarole"?

Welcome to your first post-hiatus post from Fandom Grammar. As I hope you saw a couple of days ago, the community is back to a weekly posting schedule, and we're expanding our communications beyond LiveJournal to other social media. If you have questions, please submit them as comments to this post, as we'd love to start answering them again.

This week I'll be looking at the origin of the word rigmarole, and what it means today.

John and Harold, from Person of Interest, will go through the rigmarole of finding an answer.Collapse )

Fandom Grammar Is Back!

Welcome back to fandom_grammar! We are returning to regular posting starting this Monday. We'll have a reduced schedule for the time being with posts only on Mondays.

In addition to finding Fandom Grammar on Livejournal, you can now also find us on Twitter and Tumblr! Our extended social media will include links to the articles posted on this site, including links to previously posted content. New content will be posted Tuesdays, and previous content on Fridays (starting mid-October).

Twitter: @fandomgrammar
Tumblr: fandom-grammar


Come back next Monday to get your grammar on!


If you have any questions about grammar, syntax, or writing, please submit them to our queue. These can be questions you have personally or errors you see when reading.

Fandom Grammar Hiatus

We apologize for the delay in notification, but due to some real-life conflicts, fandom_grammar will be taking an extended hiatus. Never fear, fandom_grammar will be returning in July! This summer we'll be back to answering your questions and continuing to provide grammar and writing advice. Additionally, we'll be expanding to new social media outlets—so we really will be back and bigger than ever!

You are more than welcome to continue asking grammar and writing questions, and we'll incorporate them in our queue for our return this summer.

Mind those commas while we're gone.

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